2019 ARA Salary Survey (part 1)

In December 2019 the ARA launched a salary survey of the archives and records sector. This was the first salary survey on this scale in recent years, and was promoted to ARA members and non-members across the UK and Republic of Ireland. 832 individuals responded, of which 77% were members of ARA. 91% were based in the UK. Thank you to all those who took part.

The key findings are as follows;

Salaries

  • Registered Members of the ARA are more likely to report higher salaries. 25% of survey respondents were Registered and the most common salary ranges reported by this group was £37,001 – £40,000 (10%) followed by £29,001 – £31,000 (9%) and £27,001 – £29,000 (8%). The highest salary reported was £70,000 or more (1%) and the lowest was less than £14,000 (3%).  Fig 1 sets out the salary responses of RMARA who responded to our survey.
  • In the UK, the most commonly reported salary ranges from ARA members who are not Registered Members are £27,001 – £29,000 (13% of respondents), followed by £29,001 – £31,000 (10%) and £31,001 – £33,000 (9%). 4% earned less than £14,000, the lowest salary range. 1% earn over £70,000, the highest salary range.  The most common salary ranges reported by those who are not ARA members are £27,001-£29,000 (11%), £29,001 – £31,000 (10%) and £25,001 – £27,001 (9%). Fig 2 sets out the full salary responses.
  • 100 respondents were based in Scotland (13%). From that number, the most common salary range is £29,001 – £31,000 (16%) followed by £35,001 – £37,000 (11%) and £23,001 – £25,000 (8%). 1% earned less than £14,000. The highest salary reported was £56,001 – £58,000 (1%).
  • 28 respondents were based in Wales (4%). From that number, the most common salary range was £33,001 – £35,000 (14%), £29,001 – £31,000 (4%), £40,001 – £43,000 (3%).
  • 618 respondents were based in England (82%). From that number, the most common salary reported is £27,001 – £29,000 (14%) followed by £13,001 – £33,000 (10%) and £29,001 – £31,000 (9%). 4% reported earning less than £14,000.  1% reported earning £70,000 or more, the highest salary range.
  • In the Republic of Ireland, the most common salary ranges in equal proportions (6%) are €50,001 – €53,000 and €33,001 – €35,000. Less than 1% earn less than £14,000, the lowest salary range. 5% earn €70,001 or more. 13% of respondents were Registered Members, and their most common salary ranges were €50,001 – €53,000 (4%) and €65,001 – €70,000 (3%). 9% of respondents were based in the Republic.

Gender and Pay

In the UK 566 respondents identified as female (75%), 185 as male (24%), 2 identified as non-binary and 4 preferred not to respond.

  • The most common salary range reported by women in the UK was £27,001 – £29,000 (13%) followed by £29,001 – £31,00 (11%) and £31,001 – £33,000 (10%). The lowest range was less than £14,000 (4%) the highest was £65,001 – £70,000 (less than 1%). 77% work full-time with 19% working part-time.
  • The most common salary range reported by men was £27,001 – £29,000 (11%) followed by £37,001 – £40,000 (9%) and £40,001 – £43,000 (8%). 89% work full-time, with 12% of that number employed on temporary/fixed term contracts. 10% work part-time.

In the Republic of Ireland 65 respondents identified as female (87%) and 10 male (13%).

  • The most common salary ranges reported by women in equal proportions (5%) are €47,001 – €50,000, €40,001 – €43,000, €33,001 – €35,000, €29,001 – €31,000 and €27,001 – €29,000. 91% of women who responded to the survey work full-time. This includes 21% who are employed on temporary/fixed term contracts. 4% work part-time.
  • For men, the most common salary ranges reported were also in equal proportions (20%) and were as follows; €70,001 or more, €50,001 – €53,000 and €43,001 – €45,000. 100% of men responding to the survey work full-time, with 40% employed on temporary/fixed term contracts.

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